Bringin' home the hardware… posthumously.

I received some pretty cool news last night from my former co-worker Brandon Stahl.  Brandon was down in the Twin Cities at the Minnesota Society of Professional Journalists banquet and informed me that I took home two first place awards in the under 50,000 circulation newspapers in the General News and Sports divisions.  It was nice to hear the news, but was bittersweet as I’m no longer at the News Tribune.  In any case, I’m proud of how I did and happy for the other journalists at the News Tribune who garnered awards.

Other DNT journalists who took home first place awards included reporters Mark Stodghill, Janna Goerdt, Brandon Stahl, John Myers, Andy Greder, Jon Nowacki, Steve Lindstrom, Chuck Frederick, Gary Meader, fellow photographer Amanda Hansmeyer, Andrew Krueger and Photo Editor Bob King.  Peter Passi, Kevin Pates, Robin Washington, Tamara Gruhot and the entire staff brought home additional awards for their work.  Brandon Stahl also won third place for his buzz.duluth blog.  Congrats to all of them!

Here are the photos that brought home the awards for me…

David Stevens of South Range comforts a horse that was rescued from frigid temperatures over the weekend at Jeff Tucker's Raindance Farms.  Windchill the horse is a bit of a legend at the DNT.  The staff followed the story of this frozen colt who ended up passing away a few days after this photo was taken.  The people charged with Windchill's care were eventually convicted of neglect.  There is something about me and assignments with horses where I always seem to come back with a photo I really like.  Maybe it's the gentle nature of horses and people's attraction to them that always generates a genuine moment.  In Windchill's case, it was simply a matter of people who deeply cared for this animal and were doing all the could to comfort and nurse him back to health.

David Stevens of South Range comforts a horse that was rescued from frigid temperatures over the weekend at Jeff Tucker's Raindance Farms. Windchill the horse is a bit of a legend at the DNT. The staff followed the story of this frozen colt who ended up passing away a few days after this photo was taken. The people charged with Windchill's care were eventually convicted of neglect. There is something about me and assignments with horses where I always seem to come back with a photo I really like. Maybe it's the gentle nature of horses and people's attraction to them that always generates a genuine moment. In Windchill's case, it was simply a matter of people who deeply cared for this animal and were doing all the could to comfort and nurse him back to health.

Hermantown's Hannah Buchite could barely watch Cloquet's Hannah Roy as she toed the line during a shootout in the Region 7A sectional final at Public Schools Stadium in Duluth.  Roy's shot sailed over the net, which sent the Hawks to the state tournament.  This was one of those games that photographers dream about.  Two rivals.  A close game with lots of action.  An overtime that led to a shootout and lots of nerves playing out on the field in the form of painful expressions and nervous demeanors.  One such player, Hannah Buchite of Hermantown, embodied all the emotions of these players as the game inched to its conclusion.  You could just feel the nerves pouring out and a few seconds later they morphed into jubilation, exhilaration and relief.  This might have been my favorite sports image of 2008.

Hermantown's Hannah Buchite could barely watch Cloquet's Hannah Roy as she toed the line during a shootout in the Region 7A sectional final at Public Schools Stadium in Duluth. Roy's shot sailed over the net, which sent the Hawks to the state tournament. This was one of those games that photographers dream about. Two rivals. A close game with lots of action. An overtime that led to a shootout and lots of nerves playing out on the field in the form of painful expressions and nervous demeanors. One such player, Hannah Buchite of Hermantown, embodied all the emotions of these players as the game inched to its conclusion. You could just feel the nerves pouring out and a few seconds later they morphed into jubilation, exhilaration and relief. This might have been my favorite sports image of 2008.